The official student-run news publication of Edina High School.

Edina Zephyrus

The official student-run news publication of Edina High School.

Edina Zephyrus

The official student-run news publication of Edina High School.

Edina Zephyrus

Winter Spotify Playlist

The sky’s the limit: Kate Flick’s musical odyssey

Kate+Flick+performing+at+The+Hope%2FHearts+Run+For+the+Missing+Grace+Foundation+%28private+event%29+at+the+Maple+Grove+Bandshell.+Flicks+gig+was+held+on+Sunday%2C+September+24.
Lex Li
Kate Flick performing at The Hope/Hearts Run For the Missing Grace Foundation (private event) at the Maple Grove Bandshell. Flick’s gig was held on Sunday, September 24.

From the age of nine, Edina High School senior Kate Flick has turned to music to break out of her shell, working with dozens of bands and becoming a successful musician. 

Flick’s musical roots reach back to her parents. After encouraging her to begin with only two violin lessons, Flick continued the rest of her musical journey by teaching herself and finding her own opportunities. “I was a very introverted kid,” Flick said. “[My violin teacher] said, ‘If you get into music, and get good at any instrument, you’re going to have friends for the rest of your life.’” 

In addition to learning to sing, Flick picked up piano, guitar, electric bass, drums, and the ukulele. From the wide range of musical instruments, she mastered many musical genres, from classical to heavy metal. “You have to put on your own look for every different band. People can’t discriminate against you when you have different personas,” Flick said. Out of all her performances, Flick’s favorite performance was in La Crosse, Wisconsin where she put on face paint for a black metal band. 

Through social media, Flick has spread her musical talent, attracting invites to collaborate with other artists and amassing more than 4,000 followers on Instagram (@kateonkeys). By consistently posting and putting herself out there, Flick hopes she can help combat discrimination. “In music, women have it a lot harder than men. When you get to the top, it’s a lot harder for females to make it. People want a male bass player over a female bass player just because men like talking to men,” Flick said. 

“She’s going to be famous one day for sure,” junior Miranda Almen said. “She’s already playing at First Avenue, and Lizzo played there. She’s only 17.”

This piece was originally published in Zephyrus’ print edition on October 12, 2023. 

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Lexi Han
Lexi Han, Section Editor
This year will be Lexi’s (she/her) redemption arc. She is back except this time she won’t be cutting her hair or doing her nails three times a day. This summer, she spent her time working at 4 different jobs despite everyone advising against it. Not only was she hustling every day, she was spending extravagant amounts of money. This was extremely stupid. Lexi loves Dr. Pepper and chips that taste like dill pickles. She still obsesses over professional male tennis players and lets FOMO rule her life.
Lex Li
Lex Li, Staff Photographer
Lex is a second year photographer for Zeph and a legacy of her sister, who was the managing editor last year. She spends her free time with her friends or her pets (Suki the dog and Toaster the cat). She never really thought of herself as a musical enjoyer until she saw Wicked on broadway. Now she’s obsessed.

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